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engaged in a controversy about the propriety of theological conservatives cooperating with theological liberals to support evangelistic campaigns, a controversy that widened an already growing rift between separatist fundamentalists and other evangelicals.Negative publicity caused by the dispute precipitated a decline in BJU enrollment of about 10% in the years 1956–59, and seven members of the university board (of about a hundred) also resigned in support of Graham, including Graham himself and two of his staff members.Nevertheless, by the early 2000s, the university quietly reexamined its position on accreditation as degree mills proliferated and various government bureaucracies, such as law enforcement agencies, began excluding BJU graduates on the grounds that the university did not appear on appropriate federal lists.In 2004, the university began the process of joining the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools. 574)[1983], the university chose to maintain its interracial dating policy and pay a million dollars in back taxes.Nevertheless, Jones's move to Cleveland proved extraordinarily advantageous.Bankrupt at the nadir of the Depression, without a home, and with barely enough money to move its library and office furniture, the college became in thirteen years the largest liberal arts college in Tennessee.It has approximately 2,800 students, and it is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) and the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools.In 2008, the university estimated the number of its graduates at 35,000, in 2017, 40,184.

In 1944, Jones wrote to John Walvoord of Dallas Theological Seminary that while the university had "no objection to educational work highly standardized….

Jones said that although he had been averse to naming the school after himself, his friends overcame his reluctance "with the argument that the school would be called by that name because of my connection with it, and to attempt to give it any other name would confuse the people." Bob Jones took no salary from the college and helped support the school with personal savings and income from his evangelistic campaigns. The Florida land boom had peaked in 1925, and a hurricane in September 1926 further reduced land values. Bob Jones College barely survived bankruptcy and its move to Cleveland, Tennessee in 1933.

In the same year, the college also ended participation in intercollegiate sports.

During the Fundamentalist-Modernist controversy of the 1920s, Christian evangelist Bob Jones, Sr.

grew increasingly concerned about the secularization of higher education and the influence of religious liberalism in denominational colleges.

Enrollment quickly rebounded, and by 1970, there were 3300 students, approximately 60% more than in 1958.

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