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Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appraise the process involved in corporate governance and how it applies to managerial accounting; evaluate the reports that make up the financial statements and how to prepare them; summarize the functions of cost classifications, cost allocation, and job order cost systems; breakdown cost-volume-profit analysis and how it relates to income statements; dissect how firms decide on a pricing strategy and the different pricing methods; summarize how companies set standard costs and why they are advantageous; point out the different methods, ratios and formulas important in financial analysis; evaluate the software programs pertinent to managerial accounting, and discover their benefits; and assess the different types of budgeting, including capital budgeting, why budgeting is important, and different methods for budgeting.Methods of instruction include audiovisual materials and case studies.Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: summarize and describe the application software used for personal, business, and workgroup use; analyze how software controls the computing environment; outline and define the components of computer hardware, including input and output devices; summarize the history of computing, including how computers have impacted society; define and appraise the different types of database systems and data types; examine and describe the basics of Internet programming, scripting languages, search engines, and Internet protocols; summarize the networking options available to interconnect computers and systems; diagram and evaluate the life cycle of developing software, such as applications, drivers, or operating systems; and describe and define the five basic elements of programming and what programmers do.Major topics include: application software; systems software; computer hardware; social impacts and history of computing; data communications; World Wide Web; networks access and architecture; software development; and programming methodology.Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand the basics of industrial labor and relations in the United States; explore the history and local, state, and national structure of unions and organized labor, including their organization and management strategies; recognize the regulation and deregulation in labor laws in the United States; list the theories and models behind union development and process certification and decertification; identify and describe collective bargaining; explore the concepts of contract administration and labor arbitration from a corporate perspective; and discover the differences in union formation and bargaining around the world.Topics include: The Industrial Relations System; Union Structure, Organization & Management; American Labor History; American Labor Law in the Private Sector Before 1960; American Labor Law in the Private Sector After 1960; The Organizing Process; Collective Bargaining; Contract Administration; Labor Arbitration; The Public Sector; International Labor Relations.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare types of businesses such as partnerships, corporations, and others; breakdown major accounting principles, such as the accounting cycle; apply the accounting equation and evaluate return on equity; compile balance sheets, income statements, and statements of cash flows; analyze financial documentation; evaluate methods for calculating inventory; appraise corporate accounting practices; differentiate adjusted and closing trial balances and more; and illustrate how businesses use rations to create financial forecasts.Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and convert percentages, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals; graph and solve 1- and 2- variable linear equations and quadratic functions using a variety of methods; compute slopes, midpoints, and distances using formulas; calculate probabilities for simple and compound events; identify and calculate statistical values such as mean, median, mode, range, and standard deviation; compute depreciation and report it on balance sheets; compare common terms pertaining to credit, interest, and purchases; solve interest, markups, markdowns, annual rates, and other financial equations; distinguish and calculate types of costs, ratios, stocks, and bonds; and demonstrate understanding of gross pay, net pay, taxes, and exchange rates.Methods of instruction include audiovisual materials. Major topics include number sense; linear equations and inequalities; graphing and evaluating equations and functions; quadratic equations and functions; probability and statistics for business math; depreciation/salvage values; interest and purchases; financial analysis and business math applications.Courses consist of engaging, bite-sized video lessons that make concepts easy and fun to learn.Students can watch the lessons on their own schedule and transfer their credit recommendations to thousands of colleges and universities.Topics include: Marketing Philosophies and Ethics; Competitive Advantage; The Marketing Environment; International Marketplace; Consumer Decision Making; Business Marketing and Marketing Research; Segmentation and Product Marketing; Managing a Product and Retailing; Services Marketing, Marketing Channels & Supply Chain Management; Promotion, Advertising and Public Relations; Selling and Pricing Strategy.

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